1 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... 56

78 HAZARA DISTRICT - I m p e r I a L g a z e t t ee r o f I n d I a vol. X i I i

bet13/56
Sana06.12.2017
Hajmi5.53 Mb.

78

HAZARA DISTRICT

Hazara  under  its  former  name  Urasa  (the  modern  Rash  or  Orash) 

before the Muhammadan occupation, are found here and there.

Hazara District contains 4 towns and 914 villages. Its population 

at each of the last four enumerations was: (1868) 

opuation. 367,218, (1881) 407,075, (1891) 516,288, and (1901) 

560,288. The principal statistics of population in 1901 are shown 

below :—


Ta/istl.

Area in square 

miles.

Nur


c

5

£_

nber of

V be

J

3

>

Population.

Population per | 

square mile.

Percentage 

of 


variation 

in 


population 

be­


tween 

1891 


and IQ01.

Number of 

persons able to 

read and 

write. I

Abbottâbâd. 

Harlpur 


Mânsehra . .

Total

Tanâwal . . 

Grand total

7 ' 5

657


i

,4S6


2

I

I

4

3 5 9

311


244

ï

94,632 

273 

151,638 


228 

182,396 124

IO.7 


6-1 


1 0 - 3

3 . 5 3 5

4,715


2,104

2,85s


914

528,666 185

10,354

204


31,622 155

5

l 6

3,062

560,288 184

+ 3.5

10,870


Population  has  increased  by 

8-5 


per  cent,  during  the  last  decade, 

the  increase  being  greatest  in  the  Abbottâbâd 

tahsll

  and  least  in  that 

of 

Harlpur. 

It 

is 


divided 

into 


three 

tahsils-.

 

Abbottâbâd, 

HarIpur, 

and 


Mânsehra. 

The  head-quarters  of  these 

tahsils

  are  at  the  places 

from 

which 


each 

is 


named. 

The 


towns 

are 


the 

municipalities 

of 

Abbottâbâd 

(the 

head-quarters 

of 

the 


District), 

HarIpur, 

Nawâshahr, 

and 


Baffa. 

The 


District 

also 


contains 

the 


hill 

stations 

of 

Nathia 


Gali  with  Dungâ  Gali  (the  former  being  the  summer  head-quarters 

of 


the 

Local 


Government), 

Chângla 


Gali, 

and 


Thandiâni; 

and 


the  hill  cantonments  of  Bàra  Gali,  Kâlâ  Bagh,  Khaira  Gali,  and  Ghora 

Dakka.  Muhammadans  number 

533,000, 

or  more  than 

95 

per  cent, 

of  the  total  ;  Hindus, 

23,000  ; 

and  Sikhs, 

4,000. 


The  language  spoken 

is  chiefly  a  dialect  of  Western  Punjabi,  known  locally  as  Hindki. 

Pashtü  is  spoken  on  the  Black  Mountain  border,  and  the  Güjars  have 

a dialect of their own called Gîijarï.

In Hazara, Pathâns are not the predominant race. They number 

only 55,000, while the Güjars, who profess to be aborigines, number

92,000,  and  the  Awâns  91,000.  Tanaolis  (59,000),  though  not  Pathâns, 

are  closcly  allied  to  them  by  customs  and  tradition.  Dhünds,  another 

aboriginal  tribe,  number  25,000,  Swâtis  33,000,  and  Kharrals  16,000. 

The  Saiyids  (23,000)  exercise  great  influence  over  the  other  Muham­

madans.  Of  the  trading  classes,  Khattrls  number  13,000  and  Aroras 

only  4,000.  Brahmans  number  5,000.  Of  the  artisan  classes,  the 

Julâhàs (weavers, 16,000), Tarkhans (carpenters, ir,ooo), Mochls

AGRICULTURE

7 9

(shoemakers  and  leather-workers,  9,000),  and  Lohars  (blacksmiths, 

9,000)  are  the  most  important.  The  Kashmiris,  who  live  mainly  by 

woollen  industries,  number  15,000.  The  chief  menial  classes  are  the 

Nais  (barbers,  7,000)  and  Musallis  (sweepers,  3,000).  About  2,000 

persons  returned  themselves  as  Turks,  descendants  of  the  Turkomans 

who  came  with  Timur  in  1391.  Agriculture  supports  72  per  cent,  of 

the population.

The  Church  Missionary  Society  opened  a  branch  at  Abbottabad  in 

1899,  and  the  Peshawar  branch  of  the  society  has  an  outpost  at 

Haripur. In 1901, the District contained 17 native Christians.

The level, portion of the District enjoys a seasonable and constant 

rainfall of about 30 inches; the soil is better than that of the hill 

tracts and more easily cultivated, and the spring har- 

A g r

- C

 j

t   r


 

vest is accordingly superior. The best irrigated and 

'

manured  lands  are  equal  to  the  most  fertile  in  the  Punjab,  and  the 

harvests  are  more  certain  than  in  the  adjacent  District  of  Rawalpindi. 

The  low  dry  hills  have  a  climate  and  rainfall  similar  to  that  of  the 

plains,  but  the  soil  is  much  poorer.  In  the  temperate  hills  and  high 

land  in  the  middle  of  the  District  the  rainfall  averages  47  inches,  and 

snow  falls  occasionally;  the  autumn  crop  is  here  the  more  valuable, 

but  a  fair  proportion  of  spring  crops  are  raised.  The  mountain  tracts 

have  an  excessive  rainfall  and  a  severe  winter  ;  so  that  there  is  but 

little  spring  harvest.  The  soil  in  the  open  portion  of  the  District  is 

deep  and  rich,  the  detritus  of  the  surrounding  hills  being  lodged  in  the 

basin-like  depressions  below;  the  highlands  have  a  shallow  and  stony 

covering,  compensated  for  by  the  abundant  manure  obtained  from  the 

flocks  of  sheep  and  cattle  among  the  mountain  pastures.  The  spring 

harvest,  which  in  1903-4  formed  41  per  cent,  of  the  total  crops 

harvested,  is  sown  in  the  higher  hills  in  October,  and  lower  down  in 

November  and  December  ;  the  autumn  crops  are  sown  in  the  hills  in 

June  and  July,  while  in  the  lower  lands  seed-time  varies  from  April  to 

August with the nature of the crop.

The  District  is  held  chiefly  on  the  patfiddri  and  bhaiydchard  tenures, 

zamlnddri  lands  covering  about  339  square  miles.  The  following 

table  shows  the  main  statistics  of  cultivation  in  1903-4,  areas  being  in  , 

square miles :— Ta/isil.

Total. Cultivated. Irrigated. Forests.

Abbottäbäd 

llarïpur 

Mänsehra.

715 

207


657 

2

.

5

1

1,486 


199

121


7 5

sy

Total , 2,858

¡,858 

637


Maize covers the largest area, being grown on 273 square miles in

S o

HAZARA DISTRICT

1903-4. 


Wheat 

(171) 


comes 

next 


in 

importance, 

followed 

by 


barley (7S).

The  cultivated  area  has  increased  by  xo  per  cent,  since  the  settle­

ment  in  1874.  The  chief  field  for  extension  lies  on  the  hill-sides, 

large  areas  of  which  can  be  brought  under  cultivation  by  terracing; 

but  until  the  pressure  of  the  population  on  the  soil  becomes  much 

heavier  than  it  is  at  present,  there  is  little  prospect  of  any  considerable 

progress  in  this  direction.  Nothing  has  been  done  to  improve  the 

quality  of  the  crops  grown.  The  potato  was  introduced  shortly  after 

annexation,  and  is  now  largely  cultivated.  A  sum  of  Rs.  14,700  is 

outstanding  up  to  date  on  account  of  loans  to  agriculturists,  and 

Rs. 4,856 was advanced during 1903-4 for this purpose.

Cattle  are  most  numerous  in  the  hilly  portions  of  the  District.  The 

breed  is  small,  and  the  cows  are  poor  milkers,  but  the  introduction 

of  bulls  from  Hissar  has  done  a  good  deal  to  improve  the  quality  of 

the  stock.  Sheep  and  goats  are  grazed  in  the  District  in  large  numbers, 

chiefly  by  Gujars  ;  the  larger  flocks  migrate  at  different  seasons  of  the 

year  between  Kagan  and  Lower  Hazara  or  Rawalpindi.  The  sheep 

are  of  the  ordinary  thin-tailed  breed,  and  attempts  to  cross  them  with 

English  stock  and  to  introduce  merino  sheep  are  being  made.  Sheep 

and  goats  are  largely  exported  to  the  cantonments  and  towns  in 

Peshawar,  Rawalpindi,  and  Jhelum.  The  local  breed  of  horses  is 

small;  the  Civil  Veterinary  department  maintains  seven  horse  and 

twenty-one  donkey  stallions,  and  one  horse  and  two  pony  stallions  are 

kept  by  the  District  board.  The  Abbottabad  and  Mansehra  tahsils 

possess  a  large  number  of  mules.  A  few  camels  are  kept  in  Lower 

Hazara. 


'

The  area  irrigated  in  1903-4  was  52  square  miles,  or  8  per  cent, 

of  the  cultivated  area.  Of  this,  only  1-4  square  miles  were  supplied  by 

wells,  377  in  number,  which  are  confined  to  the  Indus  bank  and  the 

plain  round  Haripur.  They  are  built  for  the  most  part  of  boulder 

masonry,  and  are  worked  by  bullocks  with  Persian  wheels.  The  chief 

method  of  supply  is  by  cuts  from  the  Harroh,  Dor,  and  Siran  rivers 

and  minor  hill  streams.  The  undulating  formation  of  the  valleys,  and 

the  ravines  which  intersect  them,  make  any  considerable  extension  of 

irrigation very difficult.

The  two  main  classes  of  forests  in  Hazara  District  are  :  the  ‘  reserved  ’ 

forests,  in  which  only  few  rights  of  user  are  admitted,  although  the 

For  sts  villagers  are  entitled  to  a  share  in  the  price  of  the 

’  trees  felled  for  sale;  and  the  village  forests,  in  which 

Government  retains  a  similar  share,  but  which  are  otherwise  practically 

left  to  the  charge  of  the  villagers,  subject  to  the  control  of  the  Deputy- 

Commissioner.

The 


;

 reserved ’ forests, which are situated mainly in the north and



TRADE A AD COMMUNICATIONS

Si

east, cover 235 square miles, and yield annually about 80,000 and

40.000  cubic  feet  of  deodar  and  other  timber,  respectively.  The  Jhelum 

and  its  tributaries  convey  the  timber  not  used  locally.  The  most 

important  forests,  which  lie  between  altitudes  of  5,000  and  10,000 

feet,  contain  deodar,  blue  pine,  silver  fir,  spruce,  and  Quercus  incana, 

d/lataia,  and  semecarpifolia.  In  the  Gali  range,  where  deodar  is 

now  scarce,  trees  of  hardwood  species  are  abundant,  whereas  in  the 

drier  Kagan  range  and  in  the  Upper  Siran  valley  pure  deodar  forests 

are not uncommon, but the variety of species is smaller. Between

10.000  feet  and  the  limit  of  tree  growth  at  about  12,500  feet,  the  spruce 

and  silver  fir  are  the  most  common.  In  the  south  some  hardwood 

forests  of  poor  quality  are  of  importance  for  the  supply  of  firewood,  and 

at  elevations  between  3,000  and  6,000  feet  there  is  a  considerable 

extent  of  forest  in  which  Finns  longifolia  predominates.  Forest  fires, 

which  formerly  did  much  damage,  are  now  becoming  less  frequent. 

Working-plans  have  been  prepared  and  will  shortly  come  into  force  for 

all  the  ‘reserved’  forests,  which  are  controlled  by  the  Forest  officer  in 

charge  of  the  division.  In  1903-4  the  forests  yielded  a  revenue  of 

Rs. 83,000.

The  village  forests  are  not  so  strictly  preserved.  Those  of  the 

Haripur  tahsll  and  parts  of  Abbottabad,  including  Tanawal,  produce 

only  fuel;  but  in  the  northern  parts  of  the  latter  tahsll  and  in  Mansehra 

the  forests  contain  coniferous  and  deciduous  trees,  which  increase  in 

value  as  the  forests  become  less  accessible.  These  village  forests  are 

controlled,  under  the  Hazara  Forest  Regulation  of  1893,  by  the  Deputy- 

Commissioner  through  the  village  headmen,  on  the  principle  that  the 

villagers,  while  taking  without  restriction  all  that  they  require  for  their 

own  needs,  shall  not  be  permitted  to  sell  timber  or  firewood  cut  from 

them.


Of  the  1,700  square  miles  of  waste  land  in  the  District,  only  200  are 

clad  with  timber-producing  trees,  200  more  forming  fuel  reserves. 

About  200  square  miles  have  been  demarcated  as  village  forests,  to 

check  denudation  and  to  prevent  waste,  while  securing  the  produce 

to the villagers for the satisfaction of their needs.

As  already  mentioned,  coal  exists  in  the  District,  but  has  not  been 

worked.  Limestone,  building  stone,  and  gypsum  are  abundant,  and 

coarse  slate  is  found  in  places.  Antimony  and  oxide  of  lead  have  been 

observed; and iron occurs in considerable quantities, but is little worked.

The  industries  of  Hazara  are  of  only  local  importance.  The  principal 

manufacture  consists  of  coarse  cotton  cloth  and  cotton  strips  for  use  as 

turbans.  In  the  northern  glens  blankets  are  largely  ^  ^ 

made  from  sheep’s  wool.  The  domestic  art  of  communications, 

embroidering  silk  on  cotton  cloth  attains  a  higher 

degree of excellence than in any other part of the Province or the

V O L .   X I I I .  

c

82

IfAZARA DISTRICT

Punjab,  and  jewellery  of  silver  and  enamel  is  produced.  Water-mills 

are used to a considerable extent for grinding flour and husking rice.

Cotton  piece-goods,  indigo,  salt,  tobacco,  and  iron  are  imported  from 

Rawalpindi  and  the  south,  and  a  large  proportion  goes  through  to 

Kashmir  and  Bajaur,  whence  the  chief  imports  are  wood,  fibres,  and  ghi. 

Grain,  chiefly  maize,  is  exported  to  the  dry  tracts  west  of  Rawalpindi,  to 

the  Khattak  country  across  the  Indus,  and  to  Peshawar;  a  large  part 

is  bought  direct  from  the  agriculturists  by  Khattak  merchants  who 

bring  their  own  bullocks  to  carry  it  away.  Ghi  is  exported  chiefly  to 

Peshawar, and sheep and goats are sent to Peshawar and Rawalpindi.

No  railways  pass  through  the  District.  It  contains  90  miles  of 

metalled  roads  under  the  Public  Works  department,  and  r,x57  miles 

of  unmetalled  roads,  of  which  406  are  under  the  Public  Works  depart­

ment  and  the  rest  are  managed  by  the  District  board.  The  principal 

route  is  the  metalled  road  from  Hassan  Abdal  in  Attock  on  the  North­

Western  Railway,  which  passes  through  Abbottabad  and  Mansehra  to 

Srinagar  in  Kashmir,  crossing  the  Kunhar,  Kishanganga,  and  Jhelum 

rivers  by  iron  suspension  bridges.  Another  route,  not  passable  for 

wheeled  traffic,  connects  Abbottabad  with  the  hill  station  of  Murree. 

Both  routes  run  through  mountainous  country,  but  are  kept  in  excellent 

repair,  though  the  latter  is  in  winter  blocked  by  snow.  A  third  road, 

from  Hazro  to  Haripur  and  Abbottabad,  is  chiefly  used  by  Pathan 

traders  from  Peshawar.  A  tonga  and  bullock-train  service  connects 

Hassan  Abdal  on  the  North-Western  Railway  with  Abbottabad.  The 

Kunhar is crossed by several wooden bridges.

Hazara suffered great scarcity in the memorable and widespread

famine of 1783, which affected it with the same severity as the remainder

_ . 

of Northern India. During the decade ending 1870,

Famine. ... 

. , 


6

. . 


. . .

which was a period of dearth 111 the plains Districts,

the harvests of Hazara produced an excellent yield, and the high price

of grain for exportation gave large profits to the peasantry, besides

affording an incentive to increased cultivation. In 1877-8 Hazara

again experienced scarcity ; but in 1879-80 the yield was abundant, and

high prices ruled during the continuance of the Afghan War. The

District was not seriously affected by the famines of 1896-7 and

1899-1900.

The  District  is  divided  for  administrative  purposes  into  three  tahsils— 

A

biiottai


’.

ad

, H

aripur

and 

M

ansehra


each under a tahsildar and

. . . . , . naib-tahsildiir. The Deputy-Commissioner, besides

Administration.  . . . .  

.   .   ‘  

„   v   •   1

holding executive charge of the District, is Political

officer in charge of the tribes of the adjacent independent territory.

He has under him a District Judge who is usually also Additional

District Magistrate, an Assistant Commissioner who commands the

border military police, and two Extra-Assistant Commissioners, one



ADMINISTRA TION

3 3

of  whom  is  in  charge  of  the  District  treasury.  The  Forest  division 

is in charge of a Deputy-Conservator.

The  Deputy-Commissioner  as  District  Magistrate  is  responsible  for 

criminal  justice,  and  civil  judicial  work  is  under  the  District  judge. 

Both  officers  are  supervised  by  the  Divisional  and  Sessions  Judge  of  the 

Peshawar  Civil  Division.  The  District  Munsif  sits  at  Abbottabad. 

Crime in Hazara is very light for a frontier District.

Sikh  rule  in  Hazara  began  in  1818.  As  in  the  Punjab  generally,  the 

only  limit  to  the  rapacity  of  the  kcirdars  was  the  fear  of  imperilling 

future  realizations,  but  up  to  this  limit  they  exacted  the  uttermost 

farthing.  Some  parts  of  Hazara  were  too  barren  or  too  inaccessible 

to  be  worth  squeezing,  and  it  may  be  doubted  whether  the  Sikhs 

actually  collected  more  than  one-third  of  the  total  grain  produce. 

When  Major  Abbott  made  the  first  summary  settlement  of  Hazara  in 

1847-8,  he  took  one-third  as  the  fair  share  of  Government.  Records 

and  measurements  he  neither  found  nor  made,  but  he  assessed  each 

village  after  comparison  of  what  it  had  paid  with  its  degree  of  impover­

ishment.  The  Sikh  demand  was  reduced  by  16  per  cent.  In  1852 

Major  Abbott  made  a  second  summary  settlement,  which  was  in  effect 

a  redistribution  of  the  first,  and  was  less  by  Rs.  3,000  than  his  original 

demand  of  Rs.  2,06,000.  The  fact  that  the  first  assessment  was  easily 

paid  is  evidence  of  its  equity,  while  the  fact  that  it  was  reimposed,  after 

a  fall  in  prices  quite  unprecedented  in  both  suddenness  and  extent, 

points  to  the  improvement  which  must  have  taken  place  in  the  cultiva­

tion and the general circumstances of the District.

The  assessment  of  1852  remained  in  force  for  twenty  years,  and 

a  regular  settlement  was  carried  out  between  1868  and  1874.  The 

prosperity  of  the  District  had  advanced  rapidly,  and  the  demand  was 

increased  by  34  per  cent,  to  3  lakhs.  The  District  again  came  under 

settlement  in  1901,  when  a  similar  rise  in  prosperity  had  to  be  taken 

into  account.  The  new  demand  shows  an  increase  of  Rs.  20,400,  or 

7 per cent, over the demand for 1903-4.

The  collections  of  land  revenue  and  of  total  revenue  are  shown  below, 

in thousands of rupees :—

1

880-

1.

1890-1.


1900-1.

1903-4.


Land revenue . .

2,23 


!

2,26


3

,

34

*

2,40


Total revenue . .

2,9° 


j

3,io


5

,

35

*

3

>9

*  Including  collections  from  the  Attock  ta/isi/,

  which  then  formed  part  of 

the District.

The 


District 

contains 

five 

municipalities, 

H

aiupur


A

hhoi

'

tauad


B

affa

M

anskhra

and 


N

awashahr


 

and 

a‘notified 

area/ 


N

athia


 

G

ali

-<

t

//7//-D

unga

 

G

ali

Outside  these  municipal  areas,  local  affairs  are 

managed by the District board, all the members of which are appointed.

G 2


8

4

HAZARA DISTRICT

Its  income,  derived  mainly  from  a  cess  on  the  land  revenue,  amounted 

in  1903-4  to  Rs.  29,500;  and  the  expenditure  was  about  the  same,  the 

principal item being education.

The  regular  police  force  consists  of  487  of  all  ranks,  of  whom 

42  are  cantonment  and  municipal  police.  The  force  is  controlled  by 

a  Superintendent.  The  village  watchmen  number  471.  There  are 

16  police  stations,  one  outpost,  and  12  road-posts.  The  District  jail 

at  head-quarters  has  accommodation  for  114  prisoners.  The  border 

military  police,  numbering  250,  are  under  the  control  of  the  Deputy- 

Commissioner  exercised  through  the  commandant,  an  Assistant  Com­

missioner, and are distinct from the District police.

Only  2-4  of  the  District  population  could  read  and  write  in  1901,  the 

proportion  of  males  being  4-35,  and  of  females  1  per  cent.  Education 

is  most  advanced  among  Hindus  and  Sikhs.  The  number  of  pupils 

under  instruction  was  872  (in  public  schools  alone)  in  1880-1,  8,006  in 

1890-1,  5,264  in  1902-3,  and  5,439  in  1903-4.  In  the  last  year  there 

were  6  secondary  and  33  primary  (public)  schools,  and  18  advanced 

and  165  elementary  (private)  schools,  with  103  girls  in  the  public 

and  161  in  the  private  schools.  The  District  is  very  backward  in 

education.  Only  6  per  cent,  of  children  of  a  school-going  age  are 

receiving  instruction.  Some  progress,  however,  is  being  made,  and 

there  are  two  Anglo-vernacular  high  schools  at  Abbottabad.  The  total 

expenditure  011  education  in  1903-4  was  Rs.  24,000,  of  which  the 

District  fund  contributed  Rs.  8,000,  municipalities  Rs.  6,000,  and 

fees Rs. 4,000.

The  District  possesses  five  dispensaries,  at  which  83,264  cases 

were  treated  in  1904,  including  1,266  in-patients,  and  2,698  operations 

were  performed.  The  expenditure  was  Rs.  11,500,  the  greater  part  of 

which was contributed by Local funds.

In  1903-4  the  number  of  persons  successfully  vaccinated  was  10,574, 

or 19-5 per 1,000 of the population. [District Gazetteer, 1875 (under revision).]



Do'stlaringiz bilan baham:

©2018 Учебные документы
Рады что Вы стали частью нашего образовательного сообщества.
?